Art update

Hugh Scott-Douglas opening at Blum & Poe

Hugh Scott-Douglas at Blum & Poe, photo by author

Hugh Scott-Douglas at Blum & Poe, photo by author

On April 9th, I arrived at the opening of Blum & Poe’s New York gallery to view the new work of Hugh Scott-Douglas, whose career I’ve been following for a couple of years. Scott-Douglas addresses new forms of technology and their ultimate obsolescence. For this show, he printed layers of industrial black ink on aluminum panels using scans of watch gears and dust. This process produced phantom imagery from the digital scans and obscured the original digital imagery.

 Hugh Scott–Douglas Untitled, 2015, UV-curable ink on dibond, 80 x 53 inches

Hugh Scott–Douglas
Untitled, 2015, UV-curable ink on dibond, 80 x 53 in

This reminded me of Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s work “Please Empty Your Pockets” an installation which I first saw in Rafa’s studio in Montreal in 2009. He invites the public to place objects from their pockets such as keys, wallets and credit cards on the conveyor belt. Then these objects pass through the scanner and are projected back onto to the conveyor belt surface. The work remembers up to 600,000 objects cumulatively. Both artists explore the persistence of technology in our lives and its inevitable replaceability.

“Please Empty Your Pockets” 2010, Photo by: Peter Mallet

“Please Empty Your Pockets” 2010, Photo by: Peter Mallet